www.TheTruthAboutForensicScience.com Forensic Science Geek of the Week Challenge Week 17

Forensic Science Geek of the Week

Forensic Science Geek of the Week
Forensic Science Geek of the Week

Thanks to the combined inspiration of Christine Funk, Esquire and Chuck Ramsay, Esquire, a new twist of this blog is being introduced.  A weekly fun forensic science challenge/trivia question. The winner will be affectionately dubbed “www.TheTruthAboutForensicScience.com Forensic Science Geek of the Week.”

Rules:

  1. The challenge will be posted Sunday morning 12 noon EST.
  2. Answers to the challenge will be entered by responding to this blog post or the www.TheTruthAboutForensicScience.com FaceBook fan page.
  3. All comments that are answers to this blog will released after 9pm EST.
  4. The first complete and correct answer will be awarded the envious title of “www.TheTruthAboutForensicScience.com Forensic Science Geek of the Week”
  5. “www.TheTruthAboutForensicScience.com Forensic Science Geek of the Week” is entitled a one time post of his/her picture on this blog and the www.TheTruthAboutForensicScience.com FaceBook fan page. The coveted title will be his/her for that week.  Additionally, a winner will be allowed one link to one webpage of his/her choice.  Both the picture and the weblink is subject to the approval of Justin J McShane, Esquire and will only be screened for appropriate taste.
  6. The winner will be announced Sunday night.
  7. A winner may only repeat two times in a row, then will have to sit out a week to be eligible again.  This person, who was the two time in a row winner, may answer the question, but will be disqualified from the honor so as to allow others to participate.
  8. This is for learning and for fun.  EVERYONE IS ENCOURAGED TO TRY TO ANSWER THE WEEKLY QUESTION. So give it a shot.

Here it is:

The www.TheTruthAboutForensicScience.com “Forensic Science Geek of the Week” challenge question. Remember the first full and complete answer wins the honor and also gets his/her photo displayed, bragging rights for the week and finally website promotion.

OFFICIAL QUESTION:

Forensic Science Geek of the Week Question
Forensic Science Geek of the Week Question
Forensic Science Geek of the Week Question

www.TheTruthAboutForensicScience.com Forensic Science Geek of the Week Questions:

  1. What is this?
  2. What forensic science disciplines is it used in?

The Hall of Fame for the www.TheTruthAboutForensicScience.com Forensic Science Geek of the Week:
Week 1: Chuck Ramsay, Esquire

Week 2: Rick McIndoe, PhD

Week 3: Christine Funk, Esquire

Week 4: Stephen Daniels

Week 5: Stephen Daniels

Week 6: Richard Middlebrook, Esquire

Week 7: Christine Funk, Esquire

Week 8: Ron Moore, B.S., J.D.

Week 9: Ron Moore, B.S., J.D.

Week 10: Kelly Case, Esquire and Michael Dye, Esquire

Week 11: Brian Manchester, Esquire

Week 12: Ron Moore, B.S., J.D.

Week 13:  Ron Moore, B.S., J.D.

Week 14:  UNCLAIMED ANSWER IT!

Week 15:  Joshua Dale, Esquire and Steven W. Hernandez, Esquire

Week 16: Christine Funk, Esquire

WEEK 17:  IT COULD BE YOU!

6 Responses to “www.TheTruthAboutForensicScience.com Forensic Science Geek of the Week Challenge Week 17”

  • A White Light Scanner (WLS) is a device for measuring the physical geometrical characteristics of an object. It is the most accurate device for measuring the entire physical geometrical characteristics of an object 3 dimensionally. This machine may be manually controlled by an operator or it may be computer controlled by a robot. Conventional WLS systems use fringe contrast to yield surface information. Frequency domain analysis (FDA) is an alternate approach that uses all of the information available in the interferogram. This Fourier analysis method is used to convert intensity data to the spatial frequency domain, allowing production of an extremely accurate surface map. From Wiki

  • 1.) It’s a Infrared Microspectroscopy
    2.) It’s used in Forensic Science Hair & Fiber Analysis using a
    non-destructive nature and the microscope has the ability to analyze with a small amount of sample (as low as a picogram or less) which makes it ideal for the limited-quantity sample evidence usually associated with forensic investigations.

  • It is a scanning white light interferometer.

    It is used to measure distances between two marks on a straight line. It provides a quantitative measure for tool mark identification.

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